The potential power of ‘The Times’ & ‘Downton Abbey’.

.

Sas is still not feeling well enough to return to writing her blog so as her friend I’ve stepped in this week. However, she has noticed some improvement and hopes to be back by next week.

Despite all determination, Sas’s immune system was too weak to fight off some infectious bugs. It serves as a sad reminder that stroke survivors have many challenges to face.

Reading the Times newspaper the other day I learnt that the Stroke Assocition is one of their chosen charities for this years Christmas appeal. The article was about Lady Fellowes, the wife of Julian Fellowes, the writer of Downton Abbey. Her father suffered a stroke when she was only eight years old and sadly died following a second stroke. Many years later her uncle had a stroke on an underground train but due to the FAST campaign highlighting symptoms of stroke, fellow passengers and staff recognised the condition and dealt with it swiftly & successfully.

These personal experiences encouraged Lord and Lady Fellowes to get in touch with the Stroke Association and become one of their celebratory supporters. Despite the fact that stroke is Britains third biggest killer it is still not’ portrayed ‘ as such and as Julian Fellowes admits you never see a TV drama about a person suffering a stroke. According to scienceogram.org.uk government spends money on research: £4.30 per person on cancer, £1.30 on heart disease but only £0.28 on stroke. These are truly staggering figures and highlight the importance of raising the profile of stroke. As Sas keeps saying too we should remember our brain controls our body & it’s organs.  

If EastEnders can tackle prostate, breast cancer and stroke, and doctors can report a rise of awareness due to a this drama, cant’ maybe Downton do the same now, and tackle stroke in such a way as to remove some of the stigma sadly attached.

Maybe they and the Times could go a step further & promote Sas’s book ‘Two strokes not Out’, mentioning that sales create revenue for Stroke Awareness. Win-win for survivors and charity alike, along with a more positive image for life after stroke.

To see perhaps one of the Lady’s in Downton still appearing glamorous, being seen in Rules as pre stroke days etc. This could change the General Public’s impression in such a positive manner. I know Sas would be more than happy to give her time in anyway that could be of help/ value.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *